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Myra Bairstow, Randy Ploog, and Ani Boyajan | Bios

For Permissions / Copyright Information’ contact Myra Bairstow, Director, at: Info@mdawson.com

Myra Bairstow

Myra Bairstow Myra Bairstow is the co-author and director of the Manierre Dawson Catalogue Raisonné. Ms. Bairstow is an independent scholar and curator specializing in the work of Manierre Dawson. She has collaborated with The Hollis Taggart Galleries and co-curated groundbreaking exhibitions including “Manierre Dawson: American Pioneer of Abstract Art” (New York), “Manierre Dawson: New Revelations” (Chicago) and “Manierre Dawson: A Catalogue Raisonné” (New York).

In addition to her work on Dawson, Ms. Bairstow is one of the leading scholars on the painting entitled ‘Suicide of Dorothy Hale’ by Mexican artist Frida Kahlo. Ms. Bairstow’s decade of research into Dorothy Hale’s life and mysterious death has rewritten the history of the painting. Her play, ‘The Rise of Dorothy Hale’ was produced Off-Broadway. NBC featured Ms. Bairstow’s research and her play in a documentary they produced on Kahlo, entitled ‘Frida’. Ms. Bairstow is currently working on a book about Dorothy Hale.

Contact Myra Bairstow at: Info@mdawson.com

Randy Ploog, Ph.D.

Randy PloogRandy Ploog, Ph.D., is an art historian whose research has focused on Manierre Dawson for nearly fifteen years. He has published a number of essays on Dawson including the exhibition catalogues, Manierre Dawson: America Pioneer of Abstraction Art (New York: Hollis Taggart Galleries, 1999) and Manierre Dawson: New Revelations (Chicago: Hollis Taggart Galleries, 2003). He has also lectured on the artist at the National Gallery of Art, Washington D.C.; the Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice, Italy; the Newberry Library, Chicago; the Chicago Architecture Foundation; West Shore Community College, Ludington, Michigan; and at Virginia Tech University. While pursuing biographic information on Dawson and his family, Ploog discovered that Manierre Dawson’s brother, Mitchell Dawson, was an attorney, a published poet and, on occasion, served as an agent for many prominent American writers. Upon completion of the Manierre Dawson catalogue raisonné, Ploog hopes to begin work on a duo-biography of the Dawson brothers, Manierre as painter and Mitchell as poet.

Ploog is an Affiliate Assistant Professor of Art History and the Coordinator of International Programs for the College of Arts and Architecture at the Pennsylvania State University.

Contact Randy Ploog at: rxp5@psu.edu

Ani Boyajan

Ani Boyajian is the editor of the Manierre Dawson catalogue raisonné project. She is also a consulting editor of the Hans Hofmann catalogue raisonné project, and has consulted on other catalogues raisonnés in progress on preeminent American artists. She is the author (ed.) of Stuart Davis: A Catalogue Raisonné, published in 2007 by Yale University Art Gallery in association with Yale University Press, New Haven (co-edited by Mark Rutkoski, with introductory essays by William C. Agee and Karen Wilkin). Awarded the best art book of 2007 with the Art Libraries Society of North America’s prestigious George Wittenborn Memorial Book Award, it also won an Awards of Excellence Honorable Mention from the Association of American Publishers, Professional and Scholarly Publications. She has contributed essays and texts about Stuart Davis to numerous other publications. Likewise, she has contributed her expertise toward exhibitions, including the major Stuart Davis retrospective organized by the Peggy Guggenheim Collection in Venice, which toured Europe and had its final venue at the Smithsonian American Art Museum in 1998. Ms. Boyajian has a history of diverse curatorial experience, and was a former chairman and curator of the Venice Biennale Armenian Pavilion. As the former curatorial coordinator at the Whitney Museum of American Art at Equitable Center in New York, she organized twenty exhibitions, with associated publications, which focused on both early twentieth century and contemporary art. She holds an MFA in painting and contemporary art criticism, and has continued to make her own art throughout her career.